FAQs

Miami Valley Sports Car Club Frequently Asked Questions

What is an Autocross event?


Autocross events are low to medium speed auto racing events; they are often run on parking lots and airport runways, although street events and events at Go Kart tracks sometimes take place. Generally a course will be defined using traffic cones. One driver at a time negotiates a course laid out with the cones, or pylons, testing their skill against the clock. Time penalties are charged for disturbing cones. Here at MVSCC, the time penalty is 2 seconds per cone.

Autocross involves speeds that most might have encountered on the streets and highways; the fastest cars usually do not get much above 70mph. We generally aim for 6-8 runs per driver. A driver is awarded the best time of all runs taken.

Who Autocrosses?


Most autocrossers are driving/racing enthusiasts who enjoy motorsports competition. In fact, a large percentage of participants do not even own a “racecar”! They race the car they drive on the street. Some autocrossers are serious road race drivers who want to practice technique. Most are like you and me: laypeople with an itch for speed!

Why Autocross?


Autocross is an inexpensive, safe way to experience racing. It helps you discover your car’s capabilities and limitations, making you a better, safer driver on the road. And it develops your own driving ability. Many would-be race drivers use it as a jump point into the sport of road racing. But probably the greatest thrill of autocross is the challenge of beating your own time. It’s fun!

How much does it cost?


At MVSCC, we give members better rates at our events. A day of racing typically costs our members $35. You can visit our Rates page for the latest information.

Where do you race?


We race at two locations. Here are the addresses of Springfield Upper Valley Mall and Kil-kare:

  • Springfield Upper Valley Mall 1475 Upper Valley Pike, Springfield, Ohio, 45504
  • Kilkare Speedway 1166 Dayton-Xenia Rd, Xenia, Ohio, 45385

How do I join in the fun?


It costs almost nothing to start autocrossing, and since other cars are not on the course with you, there is almost no risk of damage to your car. To get started, just go to your nearest event. Ask questions, and if you brought your car with you, you might even be able to register and race right then and there! To get started, simply preregister for one of our events online at MyAutoEvents, or simply show up to one of our events listed on the Schedule page!

Can I watch for free? Can I bring a friend?


We do not charge anything for spectators! Just come to one of our events, sign an insurance waiver, and watch the fun.

What kind of car do I need?


Almost any car (or truck) will do, as long as it passes the tech inspection. Certain “tippy” vehicles such as Jeep Wranglers or Suzuki Sidekicks are not allowed because of the increased risk of rollover. People autocross everything from modified Porsches to stock Toyota Tercels to Lincoln Town Cars!

How should I prepare my car for a race?


Your car should be well maintained at the very least. Keep up with oil/fluid changes, brake inspections, valve adjustments, etc. One particularly important part is the timing belt. Make sure it has been changed within the recommended service period. The high revs your engine will experience in a run are likely more than an old belt can take. Check your fluid levels. Clean out your car. Remove everything that you won’t need, and take out everything you brought with you before you race. As part of the tech inspection, officials will make sure there won’t be anything flying around your cabin while you’re on the course. You also might want to wash your car and the engine compartment if you haven’t done so in months. Embarassing!

Just before you get to the autocross site, stop at a service station and pump up your tires to 42 psi or so. It sounds high, but you will need extra air in those tires to prevent them from rolling over onto the sidewalls during hard cornering. When you get to the site, as a novice you might ask how much air pressure you need during your tech inspection. Then let out the air until you’ve achieved that pressure. It’s easier to let air out than to pump it in!